Tag Archives: ScienceFiction

Awaken To An Incredible Tale! 

When you review books you often encounter very pushy people who only talk to you because they want their book reviewed. It happens! I can even understand it from their perspective. It helps to get your name out there. But there are right ways and rude ways to go about getting reviews. Let me tell you about how much of a class act Edward Lazellari is and say if you want to gain someone’s interest: Edward is an author to model your approach after! 


Here’s an author who is published by Tor (and if you don’t know who Tor is then suffice to say it is one of my most favorite and trusted publishing companies) who talked with me as a person with shared interests and just politely asked if I’d be interested in reading his book. I normally don’t accept submissions as I’m trying to work through my unread books on my shelves, and I cautioned him that I was very backed up in my reading stack, but he was very polite and sent me an autographed copy of his book AWAKENINGS. A class act from start to finish!


Awakenings joined my currently reading stack and I also purchased a copy for my Kindle to be able to read while on trips. This book is an Urban Fantasy and it’s the first book of The Guardians Of Aandor trilogy. It’s also incredible!


Awakenings is a take no prisoners kick ass fast paced all out battle of a book! Right from the start you’re deep in the action and striving to learn what is happening around the characters just as they are! You see it spans across multiple worlds and the primary characters have unfortunately lost their true identies along with their memories and they’ve lost their purpose. That past quickly charges up at them and threatens to destroy them before they have the chance to learn who they are….


As I said this is a kick ass story! I took it around town to read and was quickly drawn into the world the author created. The characters are strong, the action first rate, the world building interesting, the plot compelling, the drama engaging, and the story is great! 

This is a book I not only recommend, it is one I have purchased the sequel to and look forward to reading more!

Vintage SciFi Month Reading Plans!

If 2016 doesn’t kill me then I’m going to get to celebrate a new year an another #VintageSciFiMonth in January! I’m so excited. Vintage SciFi Month has become an important part of my reading schedule. What is it? Basically: In January we read SciFi or Fantasy books published prior to our birth year! Check out the founder LittleRedReviewer’s post on VintageSciFiMonth for more details! 

Now as to my reading plans for January:


DORSAI! By Gordon R Dickson is the first book of his incredible Childe Cycle and I’ve been working through this series each January! This will be a reread for me BECAUSE I’m reading it with some friends who are starting their own Vintage SciFi Month journeys! If you aren’t sure what to read for this month please consider reading this book with us!  You can purchase it here. If you want to see my review on DORSAI! you can find it here. I really enjoy this book which is why the next book on my list is….


Tactics Of Mistake also by GRD and also in the Childe Cycle! It is the fourth book in the series yet second chronologically. I’m excited to read this for the first time and discover more about this great universe. 


What would a Vintage SciFi Month be here at RedStarReviews if there wasn’t a little Frank Herbert? The Worlds Of Frank Herbert is a collection of his Short Stories that I’ve been slowly working on and will continue with during this month!


Michael Moorcock’s book The Silver Warriors is Fantasy, but Fantasy is totally ok by the rules of Vintage SciFi Month! I loved reading the Elric Saga and I can’t wait to see what this book has in store for me!


Titan by John Varley was published in 1979 which is AFTER my birth year but it’s ok some rules can be bent AND the founder of the Month oks and books 1979 and prior so if your birth year is making it tough to find a SciFi book that interests you then open it up to 1979 and before! This whole month is supposed to be fun so feel free to have some fun!


Speaking of fun: I’ll be announcing a little Vintage SciFi Month giveaway here on my site on New Year’s Day! Stay tuned for details! Hope y’all have some excellent books picked out for the sixth annual Vintage SciFi Month! 

VintageSciFiMonth Is Approaching!

January is VintageSciFiMonth and it is fast approaching! It’s time to select some books, comic books, movies, tv shows, or radio shows that came out prior to the year you were born and enjoy them this January!


VintageSciFiMonth is really that easy to join! The “rules” are easy: you just read and enjoy older SciFi and/or Fantasy! Instead of getting into a huge debate about what qualifies as VintageSciFi the founder of the month LittleRedReviewer just asks that the book be from before the year you were born. Even this rule isn’t set in stone so if you’re wondering where to find SciFi from before you were born feel free to enjoy some from a few decades back regardless of the year of birth rule! We just want folks to join in and have fun!


If you have no idea where to start may I suggest DORSAI! by Gordon R Dickson from 1959. I’ve read this book twice now and loved it both times! To help a few of my friends ease into the world of VintageSciFi I’ll be reading it again starting 01/01/17 and you are welcome to join in! It is an awesome SciFi that will give you a good feel for SciFi around the 60’s and help you to get your feet wet! 


After DORSAI! I’ll be jumping four books ahead into The Childe Cycle by GRD and reading The Tactics Of Mistake because each January I read a little more of this excellent series of books. After that I’m still collecting my reading list but I expect it to include some Frank Herbert as well! 


TITAN by John Varley might sneak into the list since I bought it last year then realized it was published shortly after my birth…. we’ll see! 🙂 


Please join us in January for this awesome month of reading! It is amazing to see the future through the eyes of the past, and it is so much fun every year. If you’re on Twitter you can follow @VintageSciFi_ for news, updates, and features! Let me know if you need book suggestions. Looking forward to the sixth year of VintageSciFiMonth! 

Military SciFi: What Makes It Good

What qualifies a book as Military SciFi? Or better yet: What makes a story a GOOD Military SciFi story? 
Wikipedia describes it like this: “Military science fiction is a subgenre of SciFi that features the use of SciFi technology, mainly weapons, for military purposes and usually principal characters that are members of a military organization involved in military activity; occurring sometimes in outer space or on a different planet or planets.” 
I am happy with that description. Military SciFi, as basic as this sounds, involves primary characters who are based within the military and are engaged in some form of military conflict. Typically you’ll experience that war from the every day soldier’s point of view, and often that soldier will climb through the ranks so that you can experience the war from multiple levels. This leaves room for a lot of character development to happen, and in good Military SciFi that development happens.  
There it is again: GOOD Military SciFi. What sets the best stories apart from the rest? Well that is a highly subjective question, and fortunately I enjoy subjective questions! 

  
Good Military SciFi features technology, but focuses on humanity. It is a human story designed to look into the heart of humanity and warfare. Yes we want to read about the cool space guns and space ships but the story can’t be a tech manual. That’s boring and ultimately becomes outdated quickly. Good Military SciFi looks deep into us, into what makes us human, what drives us, what breaks us, and ultimately how we find the will to persevere. The cool technology sets the stage for the players to act, it isn’t meant to be the play itself.

  
Good Military SciFi should include diversity of some form. The military has often been a leader in areas of integration and diversity. It has had successes and failures but in theory it is a place where you excel based on character, deeds, and abilities. However good Military SciFi can showcase the struggle minorities face to be known for their abilities, or show a non minority character facing, acknowledging, and advancing beyond their inner prejudices. It isn’t a prerequisite of Military SciFi but the best ones do address the issue of diversity.  And we need more diversity in books.

  
Good Military SciFi deals with the moral dilemma of warfare. War is not pretty, and it is not easy, and it comes with a high cost both to the victors and the defeated. Good Military SciFi recognizes this and addresses the cost of war on the people waging it and the nation state behind them. War brings out the best and the worst in us. This fact shouldn’t be ignored. 

  
Good Military SciFi involves ambiguity. The fog of war envelops not just the plot but also the hearts and minds of the characters. Everything shouldn’t be tied up into a neat little package for the reader. The reader should have to invest in the story alongside the characters and reach their own conclusions about the dilemmas facing them. 

  
The best Military SciFi involves sacrifice. These tales should be cautionary tales designed to help us understand the high cost of war and one of those costs is sacrifice. The willingness to put your life on the line in front of others is a part of the military mindset, and often that sacrifice is required for the good of the many. 

  
Military SciFi is also about the camaraderie that military service develops. Oftentimes you’ll hear veterans attest that the primary reason they fought and held a position was for the soldier next to them. They fought, bled, and sacrificed for each other. 

  
In my eyes good Military SciFi includes a look at the technology, the trappings of the military, the training, and the actual warfare, but it goes beyond that to teach us a lesson about ourselves. About humanity. About what our soldiers face, and about our responsibility to our veterans. It lets us look into human nature and either help us understand humanity better or at least learn some of the questions about humanity that we should be asking.  
And it tells a damn good story.